spacewatching
spacewatching:

Kids today labor under the stereotype that they are preoccupied with video and online gaming, mired in digital routines to the exclusion of real-world exploration and imagination. A recent study by Kid Bunch and Touchstone Research, Inc. however, shows that today’s youngsters still dream of exploring the great beyond and learning about space exploration – both at school, and through fun and educational digital apps. An infographic prepared by Kid Bunch, juxtaposing the views of 7 – 10 year olds with those of their parents, indicates that most kids think there could be aliens in space, a third of parents believe that Mars will be colonized during their child’s lifetime, and a majority of families agree that the Apollo 11 mission that first brought mankind to the moon really happened. The study reveals that only a quarter of kids feel they’ve learned a lot about space exploration in school. Realizing the importance of science in their kids’ lives and the potential for “stealth learning”—using technology to engage and involve kids while they learn , 80% of parents agreed that there needs to be more quality educational material for kids on mobile devices. Coinciding with this need, the study found that 2/3 of kids and parents would download a mobile app that combined digital gaming with learning about space science and the Apollo 11 mission. While 90% of kids believe STEM (Science, Tech, Engineering, Math) learning subjects to be very important for children today, learning-while-gaming apps just might be the middle ground that kids and parents are looking for.

spacewatching:

Kids today labor under the stereotype that they are preoccupied with video and online gaming, mired in digital routines to the exclusion of real-world exploration and imagination. A recent study by Kid Bunch and Touchstone Research, Inc. however, shows that today’s youngsters still dream of exploring the great beyond and learning about space exploration – both at school, and through fun and educational digital apps.


An infographic prepared by Kid Bunch, juxtaposing the views of 7 – 10 year olds with those of their parents, indicates that most kids think there could be aliens in space, a third of parents believe that Mars will be colonized during their child’s lifetime, and a majority of families agree that the Apollo 11 mission that first brought mankind to the moon really happened.


The study reveals that only a quarter of kids feel they’ve learned a lot about space exploration in school. Realizing the importance of science in their kids’ lives and the potential for “stealth learning”—using technology to engage and involve kids while they learn , 80% of parents agreed that there needs to be more quality educational material for kids on mobile devices.


Coinciding with this need, the study found that 2/3 of kids and parents would download a mobile app that combined digital gaming with learning about space science and the Apollo 11 mission. While 90% of kids believe STEM (Science, Tech, Engineering, Math) learning subjects to be very important for children today, learning-while-gaming apps just might be the middle ground that kids and parents are looking for.

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There are very, very few African-American astrophysics PhDs. That’s for a reason. I was doing something people of my skin color were not supposed to do.

I was stopped and questioned seven times by University police on my way into the physics building,” he explained. “Seven times. Zero times was I stopped going into the gym — and I went to the gym a lot. That says all you need to know about how welcome I felt at Texas.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson, an anomaly in American science

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